Tena Gordon (@reformistrevolutionaryrose)

[Content Notice: Discourse on anti-Native American racism, namely trauma from kidnapping and child abuse. References to #SixtiesScoop and #residentialschool.] Credit:
Original post by @ndn.power.
End of Credit.

Image Text by @ndn.power:

Trauma Subtypes

Cultural trauma is an attack on the fabric of a society, affecting the essence of the community and its members

Historical trauma is the cumulative exposure of traumatic events that affect an individual and continues to affect subsequent generations

Intergenerational trauma occurs when trauma is not resolved, subsequently internalized, and passed from one generation to the next

Present trauma is what vulnerability Today's youth are experiencing on a daily basis

End of Image Text.

Caption by @ndn.power (Part 2 of 2):
What makes the intergenerational trauma in the case of First Nations people different is that it wasn't the result of a targeted event against an individual - it
was a set of government policies that targeted and affected a whole generation. Children were traumatized when they were taken from their parents and placed into either government-funded, church-controlled, residential learning institutions or into foster homes. Many children suffered horrific abuse while in these homes and institutions. And parents and communities were traumatized when their children were taken away from them with little or no idea if or when they would return

Direct survivors of these experiences often transmit the trauma they experienced to later generations
when they don't recognize or have the opportunity to address their issues. Over the course of time these behaviours, often destructive, become normalized within the family and their community, leading to the next generation suffering the same problems.

#firstnation #americanindian #native #indigenous

End of Caption, Part 2.
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Tags by me (@reformistrevolutionaryrose):
#NativeAmericanHeritageMonth #culturalgenocide
End of Tags by me.

Tena Gordon (@reformistrevolutionaryrose)

[Content Notice: Discourse on anti-Native American racism, namely trauma from kidnapping and child abuse. References to #SixtiesScoop and #residentialschool.] Credit:
Original post by @ndn.power.
End of Credit.

Image Text by @ndn.power:

Trauma Subtypes

Cultural trauma is an attack on the fabric of a society, affecting the essence of the community and its members

Historical trauma is the cumulative exposure of traumatic events that affect an individual and continues to affect subsequent generations

Intergenerational trauma occurs when trauma is not resolved, subsequently internalized, and passed from one generation to the next

Present trauma is what vulnerability Today's youth are experiencing on a daily basis

End of Image Text.

Caption by @ndn.power (Part 1 of 2):
Many years after the last residential
school closed its doors and most of the First Nations children taken from their homes through child welfare removal were returned, these events continue to have an impact on individuals, families and communities.

Intergenerational trauma, or transgenerational trauma, is what happens when untreated trauma-related stress experienced by survivors is passed on to second and subsequent generations. The trauma inflicted by residential schools and the Sixties Scoop was significant, and the scope of the damage these events wrought wouldn't be truly understood until years later.

Intergenerational trauma is usually seen within one family in which the parents or grandparents were traumatized, and each generation of that family continues to experience trauma in some form. In these cases the source can usually be traced back to a devastating event, and the trauma is unique to that family.

End of Caption, Part 1.

Shelby (@shelbyliskphoto)

Aaron Maracle stands in the 59ers hall, the temporary location for the kawenna’onwe immersion school, in Tyendinaga. Aaron works as a teaching assistant in the Mohawk immersion program, which had to move locations due to damage caused by flooding. Aaron reminds me that this building was the first school on the reserve. He says that when his grandfather went here he would have been beaten for speaking his language in this exact same building where Aaron now gets to stand and teach exclusively in Kanyenkeha (the Mohawk language). Nyawen’kowa to Aaron for sharing his stories with me

nina farrauto & tina turner (@ninafarrauto)

it is a primary job of ours to remember who we are. residential schools were an institutionalized genocide of indigenous culture, and only in 1996 was the last residential school in Canada closed. the implications of this wipe out of people, culture and spirit are immeasurable, and our awareness here in Canada barely scratches the surface. the washing of identity and loss of self not only impacts the schools survivors, it impacts families for years to come. these intergenerational impressions can be transparent, as so many native people were trained to shed who they are. without acknowledging this loss of self, these horrors are unintentionally passed down through families past the grips of the residential school system. i remember. @johnnnluke

MulticulturalChildrensBookDay (@readyourworldmcbd)

When a young girl helps tend to her grandmother’s garden, she begins to notice things that make her curious. Why does her grandmother have long, braided hair and beautifully coloured clothing? Why does she speak another language and spend so much time with her family? As she asks her grandmother about these things, she is told about life in a residential school a long time ago, where all of these things were taken away. When We Were Alone is a story about a difficult time in history, and, ultimately, one of empowerment and strength. 📚”When We Were Alone is rare. It is exquisite and stunning, for the power conveyed by the words Robertson wrote, and for the illustrations that Flett created. I highly recommend it." - Debbie Reese, American Indians in Children's Literature 📚Picture book for ages 4 and up #nativeamerican #kidlit #picturebook #librarian #teachersofinstagram #momsofinstagram #readyourworld #residentialschool WHEN WE WERE ALONE by David A. Robertson, illustrated by Julie Flett (@julieflett) #julieflett #davidarobertson #nativeamericanheritagemonth

Topsy Farms (@topsyfarms)

We are down to 7 Downie Sock Scarves (blue one top left just sold) but 2 of us are knitting more. Ask for one of these or make a request. Use code word GORD for $25 off. Https://store.topsyfarms.com. under Craft Products. $15 from each purchase to downiewenjack fund.

#gorddownie #thehip #firstpeople #firstpeoples #wenjackfamily #downiewenjack #sockscarf #residentialschool #survivors #pride #woolshop #woolyarn #yarnfromourfarm #ethicalfarming #ethicallifestyle #ethicalfashion #madeincanada

Inez Louis (@inezlouis)

🎬🎥A boy dreaming of his home, his parents, yayah...and his very own canoe. If only he didn’t have to go to residential school 🔜 #shinchiscanoe #residentialschool #nicolacampbell #shishietko #truthandreconciliation #trc #zanejasper ❤️🙌🏾 Based on a children’s book by Nicola Campbell
Produced by Kate Kroll
Directed by Allan Hopkins

Marissa Magneson (@marissamagnesonphotography)

Frozen Chains of Childhood is an ethnographic photograph reflecting the ice-solating and immobilizing pain Indigenous children endured in residential schools. Bound, isolated, frozen, and neglected are just a few words to describe the childhood experiences of many residential survivors. In working towards rebuilding culture, communities and lives through education and actions, perhaps we can melt these chains that once bound our people. .
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Jesse Winter (@jwintsphoto)

Gabriel sits with Marie Wilcott, a woman he assaulted more than 10 years ago. After the trial against his uncle fell apart, Marie reached out to forgive Gabriel and offer support. "Aboriginal people are starting to speak up about this now," she says. "It took 200 years to do us wrong. It could take another 200 years for us to get better."⠀
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#FirstNations #Whitehorse #Yukon #yxy #Indigenous #reconciliation #reportagespotlight #residentialschool #sixtiesscoop #photojournalism #documentary #TorontoStar #YukonNews

Cristina Bonita (@mzsummercloud)

A sad part of history that should be brought to light. I’m glad to see this is being read at my daughters school #residentialschool #iamnotanumber

Ms.N (@everything_teacher)

Our feather art for Orange Shirt Day #residentialschool 🧡

Tanya (@live_small_think_big)

War is defined as a state of armed conflict between different nations or states or different groups within a nation or state. Colonization is defined as the action or process of settling among and establishing control over the indigenous people of an area.
Lest we forget. Colonization is a polite way of saying war. .
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#Repost @lonomia (@get_repost)
・・・
☡ GRAPHIC CONTENT ☡ "Florence Genaille was just a little girl in a Brandon, Man., sanatorium when she says doctors bound her to a gurney, pumped her body with electric currents and then took notes as her fingers curled, her arms shook and her neck strained backwards.

It was 1953. The Ojibway girl from Rolling River First Nation was at the sanatorium to be treated for tuberculosis.

Today, she believes it was no treatment. It was, she says, a medical experiment and she was their "guinea pig" — an assessment that Genaille shares with hundreds of survivors of the sanatoriums, which have been closed for decades. "I'm telling you, my fingers were beginning to twist sideways, it was so incredibly painful," said Genaille, now 72. "And now to come to the conclusion our people were experimented on — it's an awful thing to think about." Genaille still does not know why doctors performed the electroconvulsive therapy. At the time, she was attending residential school outside Brandon. She had bad leg pain with no known cause. Parents of young patients were often hundreds of kilometres away in remote reserves, unaware of the procedures and therefore unable to give consent.

Gerald McIvor agrees. Back in 1952, his brother Michael was just a child when he was diagnosed with tuberculosis and sent to the sanatorium in Ninette, Man.

Decades later, he bore the scars — disabling, disfiguring markers where doctors surgically removed a back rib and the lung behind it as a theoretical treatment for the tuberculosis..." #firstnations #humanrights #Indigenous #decolonize #canada150 #residentialschool #experiment #manitoba #winnipeg #ontario #toronto #halifax #vancouver #edmonton #calgary #tuberculosis #genocide #awareness #medical #saskatoon #saskatchewan #alberta #unitednations #Canada #canadian #lestweforget #colonizationiswar

Anne Munro (@munro03)

Totem pole on way to Alert Bay from Port Hardy to be installed today on shore near former site of St. Michaels #residentialschool on eve of Cranmer Family #memorial #potlach #umistaculturalcentre

Jesse Winter (@jwintsphoto)

After the criminal trial against his uncle fell apart, Gabriel went to Vancouver to make ammends with a woman he assaulted years ago. She'd heard about the trial, and reached out to support him.⠀
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#FirstNations #Whitehorse #Yukon #yxy #Indigenous #reconciliation #reportagespotlight #residentialschool #sixtiesscoop #photojournalism #documentary #TorontoStar #YukonNews
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