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Dad Jazz

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Soakin’ up 100 years of Ward Bennett

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While the genius of Joni’s “jazz” period is undeniable, and Hejira easily ranks in my all-time of all-time top five, in these crazy mixed-up times I’ve been loving the “Geffen” years, and in particular 1991’s heavily adult-contemporary Night Ride Home. Coming out when it did, this was only ever pressed on vinyl in Germany—meaning that even though every record store in existence has a shelf of overstock Joni below the bins, this one rarely pops up. I was lucky when a copy found me in Basel a couple months back and am happy to give it its first spin in its new home on Joni’s 74th birthday. If you feel like going deepTubing for some late-era Joni, may I recommend the September 23, 1994 live appearance from a Canadian show called “Intimate & Interactive” with solo acoustic performances in full on smoky rasp, charming low-key banter that confirms her existence on a plane somewhere between Saskatoon and the cosmos, and an in-studio audience that look like a cast of extras borrowed from a scene set at Central Perk. 💙 Joni forever.

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One of my earliest memories of architecture is from my preschool, where there were two closet-sized, yellow and red painted, skylight-topped play areas recessed into the building off of a covered courtyard. If memory serves, their defining feature was that they were formed out of concrete with multiple levels to climb on or tuck yourself into, like some kind of schoolyard Lawrence Halprin landscape in miniature. Sitting in that yellow space, atop one of the concrete columns, somehow became one of those elusive memories of being 3 or 4 years old that is impossible to render fully, but clearly has shaped so many of my feelings about buildings and design and the power that spaces have over us. I’m positive that early memory is why Paul Rudolph’s Dana Arts Center at Colgate University cast a similar spell on me in my teens. As a 10th grader I visited my sister during her freshman year here, and likely passed through the building on the way to, and from, her dorm. I remember borrowing a tape of Pink Floyd’s Animals, which I hadn’t ever heard, from some guy who lived across the hall from her and putting it on as a fell asleep on the floor (likely after some good-natured, underage drinking). As I drifted off with the tape playing on auto-reverse, the building became a powerful backdrop for my dream—so powerful that I remember it still and that’s saying a lot because I don’t remember much of anything of being 14 years old otherwise. Every time I hear the pulsing guitar strumming on the intro of “Dogs” it takes me right back under that oversized porte-cochère, with flannel shirt and walkman. After I ended up at Colgate myself, I went on to attend all my art history classes here, play piano in the practice rooms, and who knows what else in its maze of levels and passages. Anyway. Buildings are pretty cool like that. I haven’t been back since 1998, but I’ll take my hazy recollections of board-formed concrete, orange wall-to-wall everything, track lighting cans, and art history slides over whatever some dimwit facilities people have done with the place now.

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Throwing tropical shade.

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Bacon Delivery—Hải Phòng, 2010.

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Pumpkin Huggers Anonymous

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If I had a yard art budget, I would definitely get a Snelson.

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Morning ☕️☕️☕️ vibes with Sandro, Susan, and Ray. From the @eamesoffice archives at the Library of Congress—December, 1978.

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Tokyo Feels, 2009

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Gunnar and I knocked down part of an abandoned wasps’ nest yesterday. I’ve never seen this premasticated wasp paper up close but it’s pretty incredible with its subtle color variation and slight metallic tinge.

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Picturing 95-year-old Frey doing nude yoga.

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Frey selected yellow curtains to match the winter wildflower blooms of San Jacinto mountain. The deep, warm blue perforated corrugated aluminum ceiling panels are just his Corbu-does-Home-Depot genius.

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I finally got to visit the Frey House II and it did not disappoint. 700 square feet with the most famous rock in 20th century architecture.

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came across this @girardstudio drawing in the @cooperhewitt online archive

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The 🍎 doesn’t fall far from the 🌳

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Way past bedtime. Just can’t get enough of this kid.

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Kindergarten Vision Quest
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