Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard) [similar]

Working at the boatyard at St Ayles at the Scottish Fisheries Museum | Sean

Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard)

RESEARCH is the last of the first class zulus, which were some of the biggest sail powered fishing vessels in the world - she's 78 feet but was by no means the largest. She's inside the museum and needs some stabilising and preservation work which will be happening this year. She had an enormous dipping lug main and a standing lug mizzen. She was decked when built and fitted with twin wing engines in the 1930s.

Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard)

Not a recommended storage option but sometimes when needs must!

Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard)

One from earlier in the year - Leonardo eating his lunch next to Reaper on the slip in Arbroath.

Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard)

But actually full of copper tacks.

Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard)

Garboard plank fitted to Star Of The Sea today. She's in a frame tilted to port to give easy access to the work area. It helps a lot but I do regularly bump my head on the lowest crossmember.

Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard)

Two extremes of galvanised boat nails.

Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard)

Leo taking photographs to produce a photogrammetry record of Primitive.

Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard)

The golden winter morning light coming into the boatyard is beautiful. Fruitful is almost ready to leave the yard.

Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard)

Reaper's masts were taken out and placed on deck a week ago - she's soon heading off to an enormous shed for some restoration work.
One of the questions we frequently get asked is what the big blue crutch on deck is for. Around here it's called a mitch and you can see it in action here. When these boats were fishing the crew used to drop the mast into the mitch at sea while drifting after shooting the nets.

Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard)

Another photo of my personal project - Good Hope, built in Newhaven in 1923 and launched as the Robina Inglis. She'll be getting a lot of repairs over the winter.

Fisheries Museum Boatyard (@sfm_boatyard)

Don't know how old this is but it still works a treat.
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