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"As a police officer, it's your duty to protect," said Zarah Churukian, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School reacting to Friday's news that armed Officer Scot Peterson took a defensive position and did not enter the building while the shooter was killing students and teachers inside. "He acted cowardly ... and if he went in there, he could have saved so many kids' lives." Peterson, an officer at the school since 2009, resigned after he was suspended. Two other officers have been placed on a restricted assignment pending an internal investigation relating the school shooting.

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On Friday night in Newtown, Connecticut, hundreds of people attended a community vigil to remember the victims of last week's mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida and the shooting that happened five years ago in their own community. Despite heavy rain, students, families and friends held candles and lined the track at Newtown High school's stadium to stand in solidarity with victims and those calling for stricter gun control laws. Photo by Drew Angerer—@gettyimages

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The U.S. Men's Curling team took down Sweden 10-7 in the gold medal match on Saturday to bring home their first ever gold medal. In a tactical, intense final match-up, Sweden was just as tough as advertised. After taking bronze at the Sochi Games four years ago and runner-up at last year’s world championships, the Swedes had their eyes on gold. But when the back and forth match was all said and done, the U.S. came out on top. The win marked only the second Olympic medal the United States has ever won in curling and the first since 2006. In the photo above, the U.S Men's Curling team looks on as the national anthem plays during the victory ceremony following the match. Photo by Richard Heathcote—Getty Images

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"I try like hell to hide that bald spot, folks. I work hard at it," President Trump joked, smoothing the back of his head as he spoke at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at National Harbor, Maryland, on February 23, 2018.
At times Friday, it appeared Trump sought to re-create the thrill of campaigning. "You don't mind if I go off-script a little bit?” he asked at one point. “Because it's sort of boring. It's a little boring." (Photo: Joshua Roberts/Reuters)

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Baseball is (almost) back.
Washington Nationals outfielder Victor Robles (16) signs autographs for young fans following their first game of spring training against the Houston Astros at The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches. (Photo: Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post)

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Today's Correspondent Spotlight comes from India bureau chief Annie Gowan: "I was running to the opening of Sunder Nursery, a newly restored park of 90 acres with Mughal tombs in Delhi, when we took a wrong turn and ended up running into these two beautiful goats. Delhi is still a city of villages so many locals keep farm animals like chickens, goats and cows. The one in the back with her North Face jacket sleeves rolled up so dainty reminded me of Audrey Hepburn and her white shirt in 'Roman Holiday.'" (Photo: @anniegowen/The Washington Post)

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Gold medalist cross-country skiers Kikkan Randall and Jessica Diggins of the U.S dance on the podium after the Women's Team Sprint Free in Pyeongchang, South Korea. (Photo: Eric Gaillard/Reuters)

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Students and their chaperones from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, wearing blue t-shirts, stand in the gallery above the Florida Senate in Tallahassee, Florida, during a moment of silence to honor the victims of last week's mass shooting on the school's campus. (Photo: Colin Hackley/Reuters)

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USA's Jocelyne Lamoreaux-Davison sneaks the puck past Canada goalkeeper Shannon Szabados with what would be the shootout game-winner, giving USA its first gold medal in women's ice hockey in 20 years on February 22, 2018.
After five shots each, the deadlock remained. Lamoureux-Davidson was the sixth American to try. She deked up, then left, then pulled the puck back right, where Szabados had no chance. (Photo: Larry W. Smith/Epa-Efe/Rex/Shutterstock)

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"I hear you."
President Donald Trump holds notes during a listening session with high school students and teachers in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018.

Trump heard the stories of students and parents affected by school shootings, following last week's deadly shooting in Florida. (Photo: Carolyn Kaster/@ap.images)

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Hundreds of high school students across the state of Florida staged walkouts Tuesday and Wednesday to protest gun violence in the wake of last week’s deadly school shooting and demand that lawmakers take action to strengthen gun control laws. Some of the crowds chanted “we want change” and “stand up, fight back,” while others chanted “never again” and “I will not be a victim." More walkouts are being planned for March 14, which will mark one month after the shooting.

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Survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting, along with hundreds of other students, gathered on the steps of the Florida capitol on Wednesday to demand that lawmakers take action in the final weeks of the legislative session to curb the sale of assault rifles. In other parts of the state, Florida students walked out of school in protest, gathering in parks or marching in the streets. Republican leaders have been quietly working with Democrats from the community in Broward County on new laws that they hope to pass before the March 9 close of the legislative session. These include new age restrictions on buyers of semiautomatic rifles and new powers for police to confiscate guns from people deemed dangerous by the courts. But the proposals stop short of the demands of many student survivors of last week’s shooting, who have been busing to Tallahassee to demand a complete ban on the sale of assault weapons. On Tuesday, the Republican-dominated Florida House handily defeated an effort to open debate on an assault-weapons ban, as several students watched tearfully from the gallery.

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Introducing @eatvoraciously, a new destination from Washington Post Food that will give you the tips, tricks and techniques to match your appetite. There will be how-tos, equipment and ingredient guides and tons of great recipes you’ll be able to make. The best part? There's no experience required. Follow @eatvoraciously and click the link in our bio to learn more.

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The new paintings of former president Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama, attracted big crowds to the National Portrait Gallery last week, where thousands of visitors lined up for hours to see the works and snap pictures in front of them. The portraits attracted international attention when they were unveiled Feb. 12, and the enthusiasm continued during the first week they were on view to the public. More than 72,100 visitors — including 50,000 during the long Presidents’ Day weekend — entered the museum during the first week, officials said. Those numbers are more than three times greater than last year’s holiday weekend, which attracted just over 16 thousand visitors. Photo by @vanhoutenphoto/@washingtonpost

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One of the largest and most popular groups on the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School campus, the Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) lost three members during Wednesday's tragic mass shooting that took the lives of 17 in total. Member Peter Wang, 15, was killed putting himself at risk, holding a door open so that others might survive. Peter’s sacrifice was, as current members put it, an example of the “selfless service” JROTC embraces. “That’s the biggest act of kindness he could ever do,” said Cadet Capt. Angelyse Perez (right), an 18-year-old senior and the Bravo Company commander. Alaina Petty, 14, and Martin Duque, 14, other members of the group, were also shot and killed in the rampage. In the days since the shooting, Angelyse and Cadet Capt. Madison Geller (left), wanted to get together with family to try to understand what happened and to seek comfort from one another. And when they say family, they mean more than just parents and siblings. Angelyse and Madison — best friends, constant confidantes — wanted to get their JROTC battalion together to help process the tragedy as best they could. Read more on washingtonpost.com. Photo by @mattmcclainphoto—The Washington Post

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Fact Check: "Forty percent of the guns in this country are sold without any background checks," Sen. Bernie Sanders said Sunday. This number comes from a study that's two decades old and looked at person to person sales, not all gun sales. The 40 percent statistic was based on one relatively small survey of 251 people about guns they obtained in 1993 and 1994, even though the law mandating background checks only went into effect in early 1994. The most recent research, a survey published in 2017 (based off gun owners who obtained a firearm in the past two years), indicates that 13 percent of guns — not 40 percent — are purchased without a background check. So, no matter how you look at it, Sen. Sanders' claim is just plain wrong. Our Fact Checker team gives him four Pinocchios: 🤥🤥🤥🤥

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Chop fearlessly. Bake boldly. Cook confidently. Something fresh is coming tomorrow from @wapofood. Swipe through for a hint and follow them for the scoop 🍦 (Photo by Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post)

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"Kids in Flint always see themselves portrayed in the media as victims. Black Panther gives Flint kids a chance to see themselves represented on the big screen as royalty and heroes," 10-year-old Flint resident Mari Copeny (third from left) told The Flint Journal-MLive.com. Copeny raised $16,000 through GoFundMe to provide free tickets to 150 kids for a screening of the film on Monday. "Representation across all forms of media is important, especially in media that children consume," Copeny said. "You can be your own hero. You can be a superhero, but ultimately you're your own hero. Black Panther teaches us that we can be whoever you want to be. And that especially goes for Flint kids." Copeny also gave away $2,000 in Black Panther toys and comic books at the screening. Photo by Jake May /The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP

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Rachel Crooks, one of the 19 women who have accused Donald Trump of sexual misconduct, has told her story many times. But despite her story, and the similar stories of others, nothing has changed. For several years she had barely told anybody about Trump, because she assumed nothing would come of her story. But after coming forward during the 2016 presidential campaign, she has spent 18 months repeating it and proving herself right. In early February, Crooks, 35, launched a campaign to become a Democratic state representative in Ohio, in part so she could share her story more widely with voters across the state. And yet, after dozens of retellings, she still asks herself: Did people really care? Did it matter at all? Read more through the link in our bio. Photo by @vanhoutenphoto

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Five days after Zimbabwean opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai died following a battle with cancer, thousands of mourners gathered on Monday in Harare to pay tribute. Tsvangirai rose to prominence after founding the country's largest opposition party, the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) and becoming a nemesis to former president of Zimbabwe Robert Mugabe. He was a symbol of resistance to the ruling party’s authoritarianism, which has been entrenched since Zimbabwe broke away from Britain in 1980. Tsvangirai’s death comes during a critical transition in Zimbabwe’s national politics. It was only a few of months ago that Mugabe left the presidency after nearly 40 years of ruling the country. Photos by Jekesai Njikizana—@afpphoto; Philimon Bulawayo—@reuters
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