Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst) [similar]

Creating awareness on the plight of our planet's wildlife and the environment on which we all depend. 👇TAKE ACTION

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Beautiful but deadly.
Via BBC #BluePlanet2

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Beautiful story from @dswt: On October 14, little Nusu came into this world. His mum, Nasalot (who we rescued in 2000 after poachers killed her mother for her ivory), is a natural at motherhood — although she’s rather perplexed by Nusu’s habit of diving into the water trough!
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Last month saw the birth of three DSWT “grandkids” — and this week, we’re celebrating these special October babies. Yesterday, we featured Yoyo. Keep an eye out for tomorrow’s feature!
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Video ©️ David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step...even for a baby sea turtle. Look at him go! #TurtleTuesday
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Video: Peter King

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

@DavidYarrow is known for his black and white wildlife photos, like this stunning image of a polar bear. He says of the photo, “It’s made complete by its lack of completeness—the storytelling is started by the camera and finished by the viewer.”
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"Less is more in the arctic—its beauty is in its simplicity and the enormity of the white detail. It is not a noisy place, in fact it is characterised by the lack of noise. The image pays homage to that variable—it conveys a true sense of place. This is not a natural human habitat—it is in fact our final frontier."

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Ruma and Vali, mother and son, live in a private safari park in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina – a world away from the vast forests of western and central Africa where their species once thrived. Chimpanzees have lost around three quarters of their population in the past century and remain highly vulnerable to poaching and disease. They are hunted for their meat, which is eaten locally and smuggled abroad.
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Photo: Tim Flach

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Have you ever seen a bird feed a goldfish?
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A few years ago, a birdwatcher in Illinois noticed a cardinal behaving strangely in her garden. It seemed to be feeding her goldfish. The cardinal would come back to the pond as many as six times a day to feed the fish.
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Why would a bird feed an entirely different species? Princeton biologist Christina Riehl weighs in.
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“My best guess is that the appearance of the goldfish’s open mouth at the surface of the water is just similar enough in size and shape to the open mouth of a baby bird that it triggers the instinct in the adult bird to provide food to it,” says Riehl.
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Credit: NatGeo / Video via Storyful

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

'Splitting the Catch' by Norwegian photographer Audun Rikardsen / 2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year
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Sometimes it’s the fishing boats that look for the killer whales and humpbacks, hoping to locate the shoals of herring that migrate to these Arctic Norwegian waters. But in recent winters, the whales have also started to follow the boats. Here a large male killer whale feeds on herring that have been squeezed out of the boat’s closing fishing net. He has learnt the sound that this type of boat makes when it retrieves its gear and homed in on it. The relationship would seem to be a win-win one, but not always. Whales sometimes try to steal the fish, causing damage to the gear, and they can also become entangled in the nets, sometimes fatally, especially in the case of humpbacks. The search for solutions is under-way, including better systems for releasing any whales that get trapped.

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

RG @nrdc_org - BREAKING: NRDC & The Center for Biological Diversity are suing the Trump administration for allowing U.S. hunters to import elephant and lion trophies. Our lawsuit, filed today, aims to protect these animals and resolve confusion created by the administration’s contradictory recent announcements.

Read more about why they're taking action in @nrdc_org's profile link. #BeKindToElephants

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

This deep sea diver can hold its breath for up to 2 hours!
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Via BBC earth

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

That Monday morning struggle. 😴
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Video: @paulnicklen

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

(BBC) - Nebraska regulators have approved the Keystone XL pipeline, clearing the way for the controversial and long-delayed project to progress.
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The commissioners voted 3-2 in favour of the project, which will link Canada's oil sands to US refineries.
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The decision comes days after a leak in the existing Keystone network spilled 210,000 gallons in South Dakota.
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Former President Barack Obama had rejected the project in 2015 on environmental grounds, but President Trump reversed the decision earlier this year.
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That left the regulatory fate of the 1,179-mile (1,897-km) pipeline in the hands of Nebraska's Public Service Commission.
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The decision is subject to appeal. TransCanada is also reviewing demand from shipping firms.

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Some hopeful news, elephant lovers! 🐘
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(The Hill) - President Trump on Sunday said that his administration will soon announce its decision on the controversial practice of allowing elephant trophies to be imported into the U.S., though he seemed to cast doubt on a decision lifting a ban on the practice.
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"Big-game trophy decision will be announced next week but will be very hard pressed to change my mind that this horror show in any way helps conservation of Elephants or any other animal," Trump tweeted.
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Trump's remark comes after he said Friday he was putting the decision on hold amid a flurry of criticism.

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Whales cruising through Dolphin Cove in Australia.
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Video: @jaimenhudson

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

(ScientificAmerican) - New York City's sea level is likely to be most heavily influenced by ice melt in northeastern Greenland. Sydney may be strongly affected by shrinking glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula and around the Amundsen Sea.
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Ice loss from world's melting glaciers presents a major concern in the form of global sea-level rise—it's one of the most well-established facts about climate change. But where exactly those melting glaciers are located may make a big difference in what parts of the world they affect, and how.
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New research, published this week in the journal Science Advances, provides one of the most detailed examinations yet of how coastal cities around the world will be affected by ice melt from glaciers in different places.
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As it turns out, the effects are hardly the same from one location to the next.
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The analyses were conducted by researchers Eric Larour, Erik Ivins and Surendra Adhikari of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. And their method can be applied to any coastal city around the world, they say, providing local governments and coastal planners a major new tool to help prepare for the future in a warming world.
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The research relies on a fundamental fact about the physics of planet Earth—that is, that sea levels don't rise at the same uniform rates all around the world.

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

It's lookin' like a turtle-y lazy Sunday.

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

These persistent #clownfish use all their strength to push large objects up to 10x their weight. Trying to find a place for the female to lay her eggs, this plastic bottle isn't heavy enough to resist the strong ocean currents - Via BBC #BluePlanet2

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Sudan, the northern white rhino, is famous for all the wrong reasons.

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

#DidYouKnow: At roughly 3,000 to 4,700 meters above sea level, the Yunnan snub-nosed monkey is found at a higher altitude than any other primate. Their numbers have declined due to poaching and habitat loss. With fewer than 2,000 left in the wild, it is the most endangered of China's three snub-nosed monkey species.
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Curious about that nose? As their name implies, the nasal bones are absent, giving them unusual, upturned nostrils.
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Photo by Tim Flach

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Sometimes your friend just gives you that "WTF?!" moment.
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Photo by George Cathcart

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

(LATimes) - In a surprise move, the Trump administration will suspend its recent decision to allow hunters to bring elephant trophies back to the U.S. from parts of southern Africa, President Trump announced Friday night on Twitter.
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The move comes as celebrities, politicians and even some Trump supporters had intensely criticized the administration’s decision earlier this week to again allow the importation of elephant parts from Zambia and Zimbabwe.
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“Put big game trophy decision on hold until such time as I review all conservation facts,” Trump tweeted. “Under study for years. Will update soon with Secretary Zinke. Thank you!”
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Later Friday evening, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke issued a statement confirming the decision.
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"President Trump and I have talked and both believe that conservation and healthy herds are critical. As a result, in a manner compliant with all applicable laws, rules, and regulations, the issuing of permits is being put on hold as the decision is being reviewed," Zinke said.
#bekindtoelephants
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