Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst) [similar]

Creating awareness on the plight of our planet's wildlife and the environment on which we all depend. 👇TAKE ACTION

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

The power behind the jaws of the jaguar. Pound for pound, these guys have the strongest bite of any cat.
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Photographer Steve Winter witnessed this raw strength in 2016 when a 10-year-old male jaguar called "Scarface" attacked and killed a crocodile in Brazil's Pantanal National Park. 🐊🐆

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

A reminder from @shawnheinrichs:
Remember: when the buying stops, the killing can too. 😢💔🦈 This photo was taken while documenting the illegal wildlife trade during the filming of @racingextinction. These days are tough, but we must expose the truth. As my friend and documentary filmmaker @psihoyos says: “The power of an image is transformative.” 🙌📸 @wildaid @sea_legacy @bluespherefoundation @oceana #racingextinction #savesharks #worthmorealive #turningthetide #saveouroceans

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

(BBC News) - More than 100,000 Critically Endangered orangutans have been killed in Borneo since 1999, research has revealed.
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Scientists who carried out a 16-year survey on the island described the figure as "mind-boggling". Deforestation, driven by logging, oil palm, mining and paper mills, continues to be the main culprit.
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But the research, published in the journal Current Biology, also revealed that animals were "disappearing" from areas that remained forested.
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This implied large numbers of orangutans were simply being slaughtered, said lead researcher Maria Voigt of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany.
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Dr Voigt and her colleagues say the animals are being targeted by hunters and are being killed in retaliation for crop-raiding - a threat that has been previously underestimated.

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Not many things are cuter than a baby sloth. 😍 Check out this adorable orphan from @cranimalrescuecenter. #rescue

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

80% of #BluePlanet2 viewers learned something new, while 62% would change their habits to reduce their impact on our oceans. 💙Education is key. 🌎📚🗝️

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

"Lunge Feeding" by Bence Máté, Hungary
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'Usually only fish get to see the inside of a Dalmatian pelican's beak at such an angle. But on Lake Kerkini in Greece, local fishermen feed the pelicans, which means part of the population is particularly bold and anticipates the meals of fish offal that are thrown to them. Bence planned his trip for February, when most of the pelicans are in their breeding plumage, which includes vibrant orange throat pouches. He constructed a special floating system that would enable him to take unusual perspectives using an underwater camera with a fish-eye lens, operated from a boat some 10 metres away. 'As the pelicans lined up for fish scraps from the fishermen,' says Bence, 'I couldn't believe my luck when they lunged forwards in unison, mouths wide open.'
(Natural History Museum)

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

A group of narwhal gather at an Arctic ice floe to eat cod. Often called "unicorns of the sea", the narwhal's tusk is actually a tooth that can grow more than nine feet long. #WhaleWednesday
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📷: Paul Nicklen/NatGeo

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

From @paulhiltonphoto: Pangolin meat can fetch up to US$750,00 per kilo for this critically endangered animal, why, because people like to boast about how they pay that much and can afford to eat it. As I write this caption, somewhere another pangolin is poached to fuel this ego consumption, it’s not the poachers that have the problem, they are just trying to feed their families and let’s face it, I would do the same if I had no other options to feed my children, it’s the demand from the Ego Consumers. Is it not time for reflection in every part of our lives, how can we step up, and create a better platform for all species to coexist? #savethepangolin #saveourplanet #racingextinction @wildaid @thewcs#haka

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

"There are many great minds on Earth and not all are human." - Anthony Douglas
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🎥: @jaimenhudson

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

An estimated 8 million tons of plastic waste enters our oceans every year. From the once-pristine arctic, to the stomachs of the deepest sea creatures, plastic has turned up literally everywhere. #RethinkPlastic #SaveOurOceans

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

'In Hiding' by Scott Gutsy Tuason
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"Taken at a depth of 15 meters in 200-250m deep water. Towards the end of the 'Blackwater' dive, Edwin, one of our divemasters, called me over to show me this beautiful Jellyfish, for me only to realise it had a juvenile Trevally within it, and to my amazement, it was wedged between the bell and the tentacles! I had seen many Jack and Jelly combos before but never like this. I shot around 20 frames and right on the last few frames it turned towards me to give me this very unusual portrait of a behaviour I had never seen before."

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

It's World Pangolin Day!
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#DidYouKnow: Pangolins carry their young on their tails and will curl into a ball around them if they sense any danger. #SaveThePangolin

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Bold Eagle by Klaus Nigge, Germany
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"After several days of constant rain the bald eagle was soaked to the skin. ‘As the eagle edged nearer, picking up scraps, I lowered my head, looking through the camera to avoid direct eye contact,’ says Klaus. His low perspective and simple composition concentrates the portrait on the eagle’s expression, enhanced by the overcast light.
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Opportunists with a penchant for fish, bald eagles gather at Dutch Harbor to take advantage of the fishing industry’s leftovers. After dramatic declines in the twentieth century, the species has started to recover, but the birds are still poisoned by eating carrion containing toxic lead ammunition. A ban was recently overturned in the USA."
(Natural History Museum)

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

#DidYouKnow: Pangolins are the only mammals in the world that are covered in scales, which are made of keratin—the same substance that makes up our hair and fingernails.
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Video: @garamba_national_park

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

This plastic polar bear sends a pretty clear message on our ocean's plastics - Via BBC World Service

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

The use of wild animals in circuses in Wales could be coming to and end. The Welsh government said it was "exploring opportunities" to implement a similar ban to the one agreed by Scotland last year.
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Rural affairs secretary Lesley Griffiths announced the move saying “although there are no circuses based in Wales, they do visit and it is important the welfare needs of their animals are not overlooked."
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"The RSPCA has fought years to see this ban become a reality - and we are absolutely delighted that the Welsh Government has confirmed its intention to bring forward legislation to end this outdated and cruel practice on this country’s soil.”

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

A #win for Arctic seals. 💙
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(Inside Climate News) - A federal appeals court ruled on Monday that Arctic ringed seals must be protected under the Endangered Species Act because of their reliance on the sea ice, which is rapidly disappearing as the planet warms.
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The seals—named for the light-colored circles that dot their coats—build lairs on the surface of the sea ice to birth and protect their young. That puts them, like other species that rely on the ice, in a precarious position as it vanishes.
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"This major victory gives ringed seals vital protections in the face of climate change and melting sea ice," said Kristen Monsell, an attorney from the Center for Biological Diversity who argued the case.
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Protecting the seals means guarding their habitat, and that could impinge on oil and gas operations along Alaska's waters, which the state relies on for revenue. The protected status comes with a requirement that the federal government designate areas as "critical habitat" for the seals. That could complicate efforts by the industry—and by the state and federal government—to increase development in the area.

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Humpback whale spy hopping by Greg Lecoeur
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"Each year, I go to Tonga to lead a small group of nature enthusiasts to photograph humpback whales. Tonga offers probably the best opportunity to interact with the whales in blue water. This year was very special, with my friends we had some of my best moments in my underwater photographer's life: Very curious and playful whales came to investigate us and adopt the spy hopping posture in front of our masks. Although weighing several tens of tons this mammal showed incredible agility and power in holding itself vertically in the water. It was very impressive and we could feel the power of nature but we were also invaded at the same time a feeling of gentleness. I had the chance to freeze this moment with a split shot to recreate a spectacular moment."

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

(Independent) - China has reportedly reassigned over 60,000 soldiers to plant trees in a bid to combat pollution by increasing the country's forest coverage.
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A large regiment from the People's Liberation Army, along with some of the nation's armed police force, have been withdrawn from their posts on the northern border to work on non-military tasks inland.
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It comes as part of China's plan to plant at least 84,000 square kilometres (32,400 square miles) of trees by the end of the year, which is roughly equivalent to the size of Ireland.

Wildlife First (@wildlifefirst)

Veterinarians in California used fish skin as bandages for severely burned bears in recent wildfires.
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After a recovery period, the bears were transported to the Los Padres National Forest where the tagged animals will be monitored.
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